CONNECT 2016


Salishan Resort
Gleneden Beach, Oregon
April 19-21, 2016


CONNECT 2016 was enjoyable and productive with 48 great sessions that covered all aspects of district and council programs. It was a great effort by the planning teama dnone that we hope to build upon in 2017. OCEAN thanks all of the districts, councils, and partners that pitched in to help deliver this year's program. We also thank our sponsors (listed below) for their support. Without them, CONNECT simply wouldn't be possible. Please show them your appreciation and let them know that their sponsorship makes a difference. As always, OCEAN thanks the CONNECT 2016 presenters for delivering the relevant, high quality information that has become a hallmark of the CONNECT sessions.

CONNECT 2016 Program - Download PDF (7.5 MB)

CONNECT 2016 Schedule - Download PDF (0.1 MB)


Sponsors

OCEAN greatly appreciates the support of its sponsors, who help make CONNECT the most comprehensive and strongly attended technical training for Oregon's conservation districts. Sponsorship enables natural resource vendors and agencies to showcase their goods and services to conservation district and watershed council employees throughout the state. Go to our CONNECT 2016 Sponsors page to find out more about this year's fantastic sponsors.


CONNECT 2016 Sessions

Below are postings of CONNECT 2016 Sessions divided into tracks. Descriptions are provided and links to materials are posted where available.

Conference Keynote | Managers & Admin | Education & Outreach
Urban Conservation | Vegetation | General Technical

Conference Keynote


HEAL OUR SOILS, HEAL OUR PLANET
Kristin Ohlson, Author of "The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Foodies are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet"

One of human's greatest impact on our landscape is through agriculture. However, farming done right can not only make great food but can heal landscapes and even our climate. Find out why Kristin Ohlson and many others believe agriculture can be our "great green hope."

Additional speaker details: http://www.kristinohlson.com/about


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Managers and Admin


NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION: THE WORLD OF CONSERVATION AND WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A PUBLIC OFFICIAL
Eric Nusbaum, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (1.0 MB)

This session is for new employees of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, including Watershed Council employees employed through the SWCD. We will cover the legal responsibilities of being a public employee/official, including Government Ethics, Public Meeting and Record Laws, and the relationship between SWCDs, Watershed Councils, OWEB, ODA, the Agricultural Water Quality Rules, and the Oregon Plan. All this and more in less than an hour! So, yes, there will be lots of handouts to read later. For managers, this session may be of interest to help develop your own new employee orientation.

STATE AND SPECIAL DISTRICT INSURANCE COVERAGE
Chris Hill, Special Districts Association of Oregon
Marie Hansen-Wargnier, Oregon Department of Administrative Services
Presentation - PDF (5.4 MB)

Oregon Department of Administrative Services (DAS) provides insurance coverage for state agencies and limited coverage for SWCDs (through ODA), including general liability that includes bodily, and property damage coverage. Special Districts Insurance Services (SDIS) offers insurance coverage to SWCDs, including property casualty, workers compensation, and employee benefits. This session will help districts understand the insurance coverages available from DAS and SDIS.

EMPLOYMENT LAW UPDATES
Eric Nusbaum, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (0.1 MB)

This session will be an overview of the new “Ban the Box” and Sick Leave laws. We will also see how the new marijuana laws may effect your employment policies. Finally, how many districts have policies and procedures concerning Veterans Preference in hiring? We will look at the Veterans Preference law and what policies and procedures your district needs to have in place to comply with the law.

TIME MANAGEMENT
Eric Nusbaum, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (1.2 MB)

Tasks piling up on your desk? Never enough time to do anything? Spend the entire day working and feeling like you have gotten nothing done? I will be presenting my top 10 tips for time management as well as lead discussion on how participants in this session manage their time effectively. This is a refined version of what was presented in SWCD Managers’ Training earlier this year.

DROP IN COMPUTER TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Jason Faucera, Clackamas SWCD

This session is designed as an open forum to address some of the more common computer technical issues for which people are seeking help. We’ll start with general questions early and transition to one on one time shortly thereafter to address more specific needs. Here are some of the topics that we might discuss: Email services, websites (including WordPress), servers, software, hardware, cameras, video, among others. If I can’t answer your specific question I will do my best to get you moving in the right direction on your own. We will also discuss OACD's transition away from providing oacd.org email address support and some alternatives for Districts that will need to move to another system.

LAND AND SEA CONSERVATION STRATEGY
Paul Engelmeyer, MidCoast Watershed Council
Presentation - PDF (5.9 MB)

Come learn about land and sea conservation efforts and partnerships involving Federal, State, Watershed Councils, Conservation Organizations, Audubon, and The Wetlands Conservancy.

GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY
Spencer Rockwell, Special Districts Association of Oregon
Presentation - PDF (0.5 MB)

Managers are increasingly grappling with generational differences in their work forces. These frictions may be aggravated by new technology and work patterns that mix workers of different ages in ever-changing teams. This training will teach you ways to effectively address and take advantage of the differences in values and expectations of each generation.

CREATING QUICKBOOKS REPORTS THAT PLEASE YOUR GRANTORS
Tara Choate, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board
Tara MacMillan, Upper Deschutes Watershed Council

Tara Choate from OWEB goes over common QuickBooks mistakes that create additional verification questions on reports. Then Tara MacMillan from Upper Deschutes Watershed Council demonstrates how to enter, create, and pull QuickBooks reports that answer your grantor’s questions.


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Education and Outreach


FLAWLESS FLYERS - EXPANDED
Jessie Maran, KLiK Concepts
Presentation - PDF (5.3 MB)

Flawless fliers find the right balance between flash and substance. A concrete set of design principles can be used to consistently create clear and engaging fliers that support the purpose and goals of your event. The presenter will observe case studies that demonstrate the application of these principles to real-life public engagement materials and will work with the audience to make real-time refinements to improve a sample graphic.

MAXIMIZING YOUR OUTREACH
Jenni Remillard, Oregon Coast Aquarium
Presentation - PDF (3.6 MB)

What opportunities are available for outreach? How do you market your outreach? What makes a successful program? There will be an opportunity to share our successes and challenges, as well as brainstorming ideas.

THE WORDS WE CHOOSE: CONSERVATION MARKETING AND OUTREACH
Tracy Robillard, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Presentation - PDF (2.0 MB)

This session will provide communications tips and advice for crafting effective marketing messages for your target audiences. Topics include successful conservation messaging themes and words to avoid/use when marketing a conservation program to landowners.

DON'T TELL ME, SHOW ME: USING INFOGRAPHICS EFFECTIVELY IN CONSERVATION OUTREACH
Tracy Robillard, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Presentation - PDF (4.6 MB)

This session will provide guidance on how and when to use infographics to effectively communicate conservation programs and information. Topics include various formats and layouts of infographics, packaging information so that it is best represented graphically, and tips for some do’s and don’ts when creating an infographic.

OREGON'S SOIL HEALTH EFFORT - GROWING WITH PARTNERS
Cory Owens, Natural Resources Conservation Service

Come learn about all things soil health across Oregon including updates on partnership activities, new outreach tools, on-going projects, and what to expect in the future. Bring your organizations latest and greatest ideas and success stories for soil health. This is an opportunity to meet folks from across the state just as interested in supporting farmers, ranchers, and foresters create high functioning soils as you are!

FOCUS ON SOILS OUTREACH - COME PLAY "SOIL, IT'S ALIVE!"
Cory Owens, Natural Resources Conservation Service

In this session we will be playing the just debuted Soil: It’s Alive! game, a potentially great Soil Health outreach activity. This activity is targeted to student’s grades 6-12. We will be playing the roles of the sun, plant leaves, plant roots, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and nematodes. The soil organisms will obtain “solar energy” in the form of candy (starbursts) in exchange for nutrient candies (tootsie rolls). The organisms will play different roles in exchanging nutrient candy for solar candy. During the game, the soil organisms will have to adapt to changing soil conditions when the Queen/King rolls the soil condition dice!

MANAGING DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS
Tsipora Dimant & Carley Berkey, Beaverton Dispute Resolution Center

This interactive workshop looks at how conflicts can cause breakdowns in communication and hurt relationships. We will explore the nature of conflict and the instinctual and neurobiological conditions that keep conflicts from getting resolved. Through real-life examples provided by participants, we will practice ways to work through difficult conversations with landowners, the general public, and co-workers.

RACIAL EQUITY AND INCLUSIVE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: SHARING STORIES AND RESOURCES FOR SUPPORTING DIVERSITY WORK
Mary Logalbo & Michael Ahr, West Multnomah SWCD
Corrina Chase, Columbia Slough Watershed Council

As conservation organizations who serve the public, the West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District (WMSWCD) and Columbia Slough Watershed Council (CSWC) work to be inclusive and serve their constituents equitably. Both organizations have invested time in several trainings over the past year to learn more about racial diversity, equity, and inclusion. We’ll share stories about beginning this work in a formal capacity including some discussion on organizational assessment, creating policies, gathering data, and getting your staff and board involved in this effort. This effort is relevant to all areas- rural or urban. We hope to foster an interactive discussion during this session on how to forward this work on a statewide level.

HOW TO INCORPORATE EQUITY GOALS INTO CONSERVATION PROGRAMS
Sheilagh Diez, Metro
Handout - PDF (0.1 MB)

Join Sheilagh Diez, community partnerships coordinator with Metro's Parks and Nature department, to discuss incorporating diversity and equity goals into conservation programs. Ms. Diez will provide examples of unique contracting, community outreach, and program development approaches taken to further diversity, equity, and inclusion goals in the Parks and Nature department. She will also share Metro's broader process of developing an agency wide diversity action plan and strategic plan to advance racial equity, diversity, and inclusion. Participants will learn about both individual perspectives and institutional changes that staff members can take into consideration when incorporating diversity, equity, and inclusion goals at their organization.


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Urban Conservation


NEW MODELS FOR COMMUNITY SCIENCE ENGAGEMENT IN NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
Ted Labbe, Kingfisher Ecological Services LLC
Presentation - PDF (4.8 MB)

Technology advances, the rebirth of citizen science, and dwindling public finances in the face of emerging conservation challenges are forcing development of new models of community engagement in conservation science and management. This presentation will cover approaches, findings, and lessons-learned for conservation managers contemplating their own citizen science initiatives. This presentation will compare and contrast two different citizen scientist engagement models. The first project is the Intertwine Alliance's OakQuest, a community science effort focused on mapping imperiled Oregon white oak across the Portland metropolitan region. OakQuest engaged 180+ volunteers in documenting, learning about, and promoting the stewardship of Oregon white oak. The second is a series of stream habitat inventories led by KES. These inventories included culvert fish passage assessments and mapping undocumented headwater streams. The presentation will provide suggested ‘best practices’ for the use of citizen science in natural resources management.

RADICAL RESTORATION THROUGH COMMUNITY POWERED LANDSCAPE INTERVENTION
Eric Rosewall, Depave
Presentation - PDF (9.1 MB)

Looking to empower constituents in your watershed to transform over-paved places into community greenspaces? Depave’s model for community engagement in urban regreening utilizes cutting-edge landscape intervention to combat the negative effects of pavement. Learn about the nonprofit’s hands-on process that engages community members in replacing pavement with green infrastructure and neighborhood greenspace projects. Depave will share their approach to citizen-driven greenspaces that transform watersheds, build community, and foster stewardship through specific examples from their extensive project portfolio.

TREE SELECTION IN FRIENDS OF TREES COMMUNITY FORESTRY MODEL: WORKING TOWARD CLIMATE RESILIENCE
Erik Burke, Friends of Trees
Presentation - PDF (4.5 MB)

Friends of Trees has a nationally recognized community forestry model that engages urban community members to plant and care for city trees. This model builds community while bringing new trees and native plants to roadsides, yards, parks, and schools. Friends of Trees is also working to respond to climate change with three primary approaches: 1. planting a diverse mix of trees; 2. using broadly adaptable trees; and 3. FOT's Eugene chapter has partnered with several groups to trial a regional adaptation approach: building local sources of trees of known provenance from areas with similar regional climates to ours, with an annual summer drought, largely trees from California and western North America, but also trialing trees from the Mediterranean, Patagonia, Persia, and summer drought regions of Asia. We are learning how to overcome limits in the nursery industry and the field to procuring quality climate resilient trees. FOT's Portland chapter also is partnering with City of Portland to develop a high-quality monitoring approach that uses both volunteers and trained staff to follow tree survival and health over the short and long term.

MEADOWSCAPING
Mary Logalbo, West Multnomah SWCD
Presentation - PDF (5.1 MB)

If a significant number of landowners converted their lawns to native grasses and wildflowers, it could have a very significant impact on wildlife habitat and stormwater management. This talk will focus on how to design, install and maintain small-scale native meadow habitat. This presentation will be focused on Willamette Valley native prairie plants in an urban/suburban garden setting, but concepts are adaptable to other areas of the Pacific Northwest west of the Cascades.

RESTORING THE FUTURE: WHY WE NEED TO ENGAGE "OPPORTUNITY" YOUTH IN CONSERVATION EDUCATION AND WORK BASED LEARNING
Michael Oliver, Mt. Hood Community College

Nature-deficit disorder. Endless access to screens and technology. Childhood obesity rates. The lack of diversity among professionals in the conservation and natural resources field. A growing and widening gap in environmental equity in our urban areas. A large number of “disconnected” youth in our communities that need relevant, positive opportunities. These are just a few of the many reasons why we need to engage, educate, employ, and inspire more urban youth and youth of color in order to develop the next generation of committed conservationists. The Project YESS Youth Conservation Corps (PYYCC) is a youth development organization that has been using conservation work as a vehicle to teach life skills, work skills, and environmental literacy to youth and young adults in the East Multnomah County area for more than 18 years. This presentation will cover why the work of conservation-based youth development is so important, as well as how watershed councils, soil and water conservation districts, and other conservation agencies can play an active part in this important movement.

ENSURING EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION WITH AGRICULTURAL LANDOWNERS
Mary Anne Nash, Oregon Farm Bureau

Want to learn how to more effectively communicate with agricultural landowners and engage them as partners in projects? This workshop will look at common mistakes in communicating with agricultural landowners, how to engage landowners and partners in conservation projects, how to address landowner and neighbor concerns with projects, and how to ensure that landowners stay engaged throughout project development and implementation.

THE VALUE OF INSECTS IN URBAN ECOSYSTEMS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR CONSERVATION, EDUCATION, AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
Celeste Mazzacano, CASM Environmental LLC
Presentation - PDF (36.8 MB)

Despite the critical roles they play in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, insects are rarely the focus of urban conservation programs. Although in recent years more attention has been paid to a few select groups, such as Monarch butterflies and bees, the importance of a vast array of other urban insects has been largely overlooked, even as they are busy preying on pests, providing food for wildlife, and improving soil conditions. Conservation programs that fail to consider the habitat needs of invertebrates are leaving out a huge part of the food web. Public outreach surrounding urban insects can also have many benefits. Not only will people learn the steps to take to support beneficial insects in their own yards, enabling them to contribute directly to habitat conservation, they may also be more likely to reduce or eliminate pesticide use, and be better able to distinguish between pest and beneficial insects and to recognize invasive species. A public that is more aware and appreciative of the benefits of a diverse insect community will better understand and support the work of natural resource organizations to create and manage suitable habitat. Insects also provide excellent vehicles for increasing public engagement via participation in citizen science projects and bioblitzes. This session will discuss challenges and opportunities in urban insect conservation.

ARBORISTS, WILDLIFE, AND TREES: HOW TO IDENTIFY AND CREATE URBAN WILDLIFE HABITAT
Brian French, Aboriculture International LLC

What are the benefits of snags to wildlife? What species use snags? Arborists evaluate trees and give solutions to mitigate risks. Often, wildlife habitat exists in tree risks in the form of cavities, dead snags, or broken tops. One could say that an arborist’s job is to identify wildlife habitat, then prune or remove it. We should recognize that wildlife needs homes. The presence of wildlife in trees is often associated with risks. However, in many cases risks can be reduced and mitigated while retaining existing wildlife habitat or creating new wildlife habitat. Not all trees need to be used as habitat trees, but in the right place it can make a large difference to the surrounding community. In some instances, removing habitat may be breaking the law. Climbing arborists often make first ascents into the crowns of trees and may come in contact with wildlife. Knowing regulatory laws and protected species is the arborist’s responsibility. This presentation will show how instead of removing trees to the ground, portions can be safely retained and used as habitat.

BACKYARD HABITAT CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
Nikkie West, Audubon Society
Presentation - PDF (1.7 MB)

The Backyard Habitat Certification Program is a collaborative effort of the Audubon Society of Portland and the Columbia Land Trust. Since its launch in 2009, over 3200 yards, spanning about 750 acres have participated within the Portland metro area. The objective of the program is to provide technical assistance, incentives, and encouragement to program participants as they remove invasive weeds, naturescape with native plants, manage stormwater, reduce pesticides and steward wildlife. This presentation will focus on the nuts and bolts of how this unique program operates, as well as how we have creatively managed and sustained growth and fiscal security over the years. It will be an excellent learning opportunity for organizations that may be interested in developing similar programs.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE PRACTICES
Live Streaming NACD Urban and Community Conservation Webinar

The Snohomish Conservation District in Washington will share the District’s design work with both private homeowners and public entities including the rain gardens, stormwater pond retrofits and the studies with local cities to determine feasibility for GSI within their jurisdiction. Chuck Nahn of Nahn and Associates, LLC in Middleton, Wisconsin will showcase their porous asphalt work, including case studies of past installations and lessons learned.


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Vegetation


INTRODUCTION TO THE ORGANIC FARMING HANDBOOK
Ben Bowell, Oregon Tilth
Presentation - PDF (6.7 MB)

Join this workshop to learn about resources for working with organic producers. The new Organic Farming Handbook was developed by USDA NRCS staff and partners to support conservation professionals working with organic producers and those transitioning to organic. This workshop will explore the handbook including a description of organic farming principles and relevant USDA organic regulations. The presentation describes considerations and resources for planning conservation practices on organic operations such as cover crops, nutrient management, crop rotations, and livestock management. Bring your questions about organic certification and production practices.

RIPARIAN BIOMORPHOLOGY: STATUS, TRENDS, AND APPLICATION
Michael L. Hughes, Oregon institute of Technology
Presentation - PDF (2.7 MB)

Riparian ecosystems have been described as ecotones in which abiotic and biotic components interact to produce unique biogeophysical patterns and habitat values. Human impacts can affect riparian ecosystems in both positive and negative ways. Riparian ecosystem management and restoration often are aimed at recovery of the biogeomorphic interactions that structure and sustain riparian ecosystem patterns and habitat values. In recent decades several concepts and assessment approaches have been developed to assist resource managers in efforts to promote healthy riparian ecosystems. This presentation will provide a synthesis of scientific literature, key concepts, assessment methods, and case-study applications that focus on riparian biogeomorphology. This synthesis is intended to help participants develop a better understanding of interactions between geomorphic processes and riparian plant communities. Aspects of channel evolution theory, assessment of properly functioning condition (PFC), greenline methodology, and GIS-based approaches will be emphasized. Participants will learn and be provided documentation for a novel riparian biogeomorphology assessment method that can be geographically adapted and used in conjunction with citizen and/or landowner assessment and monitoring efforts.

ODF RULEMAKING FOR STREAMSIDE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE FOOD PLOTS
Marganne Allen, Oregon Department of Forestry
Presentation - PDF (3.9 MB)

A background information and process update for the Oregon Department of Forestry’s streamside protection and wildlife food plots will be presented. Attendees will come away with an understanding of the origins of these rulemaking processes, how to stay informed and engaged, and opportunities and outcomes for private forest landowners.

MANY HANDS MAKE RIGHT WORK: THE CLACKAMAS RIVER INVASIVE SPECIES PARTNERSHIP
Sam Leininger, Clackamas SWCD
Jenny Dezso, Clackamas River Basin Council
Presentation - PDF (1.7 MB)

The prioritization and management of invasive species is one of the toughest challenges that watershed councils and districts face. The Clackamas River Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP) was initiated to tackle this issue within the Clackamas River Basin. This partnership is a cooperative effort of the Clackamas River Basin Council (CRBC), the Clackamas Soil and Water Conservation District (CSWCD), Metro and over 13 public and non-profit partner organizations working within the watershed. The CRISP was undertaken to support the existing efforts of land managers throughout the basin, as well as address known gaps in management through survey and coordination. A management plan was created for each of the targeted areas which collectively form the Clackamas River Invasive Species Management Plan which outlines an objective approach to manage invasive species in the basin. Learn more about how this partnership was formed, the tools used to prioritize our efforts, and what’s next for the CRISP.

SELECTING COVER CROP SPECIES/MIXES TO MEET YOUR NEEDS
Annie Young-Matthews, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Presentation - PDF (5.7 MB)

MS Access Database - ZIP (11.0 MB)
This talk will demonstrate how to use a new NRCS tool available online, the Cover Crop Selection Tool for the Pacific Northwest. We will cover how to select appropriate cover crop species for your climate, soils and cover cropping objectives, and how to fit them into your cropping rotation. We’ll also discuss the use of cover crop mixes, and briefly go over how to put a mix together using a seeding calculator.

INTRODUCTION TO THE CORVALLIS PLANT MATERIAL CENTER'S SEED PRODUCTION MANUAL
Amy Bartow, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Presentation - PDF (9.0 MB)

The Native Seed Production Manual for the Pacific Northwest contains detailed, species-specific information for 17 grasses, 60 forbs, and 7 sedges and rushes found throughout the Western regions of Oregon and Washington. This presentation will cover how land managers, restorationists, landowners, or native plant enthusiasts can use the information in this manual when working with native plants. It can help with making decisions about seeding rates, using plugs or direct seeding, and how to collect seed.

RIPARIAN VEGETATION MANAGEMENT FORUM AND ROUNDTABLE HIGHLIGHTING TWO DISTRICT APPROACHES TO RIPARIAN VEGETATION MANAGEMENT
Herb Winters, Wheeler SWCD
Kammy Kern-Korot, West Multnomah SWCD
Presentation - Winters - ZIP (121.0 MB)

Presentation - Kern-Korot - PDF (3.2 MB)
This presentation will explain how Wheeler SWCD uses ODFW’s Intermediate Level Methods for Stream Habitat Surveys to create baseline data for high priority stream reaches within the county and use that data to plan, implement, and evaluate success. Each habitat unit (riffle, pool, etc.) is geo-referenced during the field survey and the data is entered into a geodatabase. The data fields that are most pertinent to Wheeler SWCD’s riparian vegetation restoration program are active soil erosion (herbaceous vegetation) and channel shade (riparian shrub and tree species height). These attributes and their locations in the stream reach help identify areas that require active or passive restoration activities. Once these projects have been planned and implemented the survey can be repeated years later to show positive changes associated with the restoration. This also provides an opportunity to locate weaknesses in the restoration planning process or identify negative impacts of practices implemented. The habitat survey and geodatabase can provide a fairly inexpensive method that improves planning and provides an opportunity to show real progress spatially over time.

Senior Conservationist Kammy Kern-Korot will give an overview of WMSWCD's Healthy Streams program, including a brief history of the program, details on prioritization, program funding and project costs, planning and technical specifications, landowner agreements, planting and maintenance schedules and logistics, implementation with paid crews, monitoring, adaptive management; and discuss successes and challenges.

USING RIPARIAN AND AQUATIC CORRIDOR NETWORKS TO BUILD CONNECTIVITY AND RESILIENCY IN THE FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE
Kendra Smith, Bonneville Environmental Foundation
Presentation - PDF (7.0 MB)

The critical ecological interactions of healthy, vegetated riparian corridors and the aquatic habitats they buffer, are well documented. Dynamic, and well adapted to disturbance, these systems will likely become increasingly important refugia in the face of climate change. Join me for a review and discussion of climate projection data, applied and mapped across Oregon. Learn how this analysis or raw data might be useful to you. Considering the projected conditions for 2040 and 2080, we will discuss management strategies one might consider to rapidly adjust to changing environmental conditions from planting techniques to beaver. Hope you can join us.

CANNABIS WITH OREGON DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Sunny Jones, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (0.5 MB)

Where do growers of cannabis fit into the Oregon Department of Agriculture? Overview of legalization of cannabis in Oregon and how that relates to Oregon agriculture.

BIOSECURITY AND WATERSHED PROTECTION
Clinton Burfitt, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (2.6 MB)

Invasive plant pests and diseases are being distributed internationally by the movement of plant material as the result of increased global trade. Impacts of newly introduced species can include increased pesticide use, economic sanctions on commodities, and adverse ecological effects to native flora and fauna. A biosecurity safeguarding continuum exists to prevent the introduction and establishment of non-native species, but when the system fails the results can have a cascade of negative socio-economic and environmental consequences. The safeguarding network includes a range of different organizations that include foreign trade partners to locally based conservation organizations. Protecting Oregon’s natural resources and water quality from the direct and in-direct impacts of invasive species requires partnerships, leveraging of resources, and an informed public.


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General Technical


STEWARDSHIP SCENARIO PLANNING USING FOREST PLANNER
David Diaz, Ecotrust

David will provide a live demonstration of Forest Planner (http://www.forestplanner.ecotrust.org) and introduce the mapping and growth-and-yield capabilities of this free web application ranging from basic map generation to scenarios comparing timber harvest costs and revenues, fire risk assessment, and carbon sequestration potential. Ongoing uses of this technology for woodland stewardship planning and a new regional cost-share program on carbon sequestration in NW Oregon and western Washington will also be discussed.

INVITE OREGON'S FARMERSAND RANCHERS TO SPEAK UP
Teresa Matteson, Benton SWCD

Ag professionals and agrarians prefer to hear conservation successes and failures from the people on the ground. Learn about two campaigns that feature extraordinary farmers and ranchers who are willing to share their nutrient management and soil health experiences. During this hour we will identify our finest land stewards and develop a strategy to invite Oregon's farmers and ranchers to speak up for conservation.

INVASIVE SPECIES PROGRAM INFORMATION SHARING SESSION
Jenny Meisel, Marion SWCD
Heath Kierstead, Benton SWCD

Join us for an hour long informal discussion/information sharing session on invasive species programs. Anyone who is involved in or has an interest in invasive species programs is welcome to attend. Topics that we plan to discuss include: challenges of working on private lands, how SWCD’s interface with Cooperative Weed Management Areas and Weed Boards, outreach/education programs, and program funding. Or bring ideas or topics of your own to discuss with the group. This is a great chance to learn what others are doing to combat invasive species in their Districts and to learn new ideas for your own program. The session will be co-lead by Jenny Meisel from Marion SWCD and Heath Keirstead from Benton SWCD.

OREGON'S PRESENT AND FUTURE WATER RESOURCES: CLIMATE, CONFLICT, AND COOPERATION
Kathie Dello, Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, Oregon State University
Gordon Grant, USDA Forest Service
Sarah Lewis, Oregon State University
Aaron Wolf, Oregon State University
Presentation - Dello - PDF (5.3 MB)

Presentation - Gordon and Lewis - PDF (3.6 MB)
Presentation - Wolf - PDF (4.9 MB)
This interactive session will present the latest science on climate change and its impact on Oregon’s water resources, as well as approaches for adapting to these changes. We will also offer skills and approaches to preventing and transforming conflicts that inevitably arise over management of our state’s shared waters.

FOOD SAFETY MODERNIZATION ACT: CONNECTIONS WITH CONSERVATION DISTRICTS
Stephanie Page, Oregon Department of Agriculture
Presentation - PDF (0.3 MB)

In this session, we’ll cover some of the main components of a newly adopted FDA rule for produce safety, including irrigation water requirements, soil amendments, and wildlife/livestock entry into fields. We’ll also cover possible connections with the work that SWCDs do.

USING THE OREGON BIODIVERSITY MAP VIEWER TO PRIORITIZE WATERSHEDS FOR FOREST HABITAT DIVERSITY PROJECTS
Jim Cathcart, West Multnomah SWCD
Presentation - PDF (2.6 MB)

The Oregon Explorer Biodiversity Map Viewer provides access to important forest and non-forest species and vegetative habitat distribution data as compiled by the Oregon Biodiversity Information Center. The data serves as an authoritative database on the distribution of threatened, endangered, sensitive, rare and other important species as well as forest vegetative habitats of high conservation value. Being assembled by 6th field watersheds, the data is at a geographic scale (10,000 – 30,000 acres) that is proximately meaningful to non-industrial private land ownerships. This session will provide an overview and demonstration of the Map Viewer and will review how it was used to prioritize forested watersheds for receiving technical and financial assistance funds for improving forest habitat diversity.

THE UNSEEN WORLD BENEATH OUR FEET: THE ROLE OF SOIL BIOTA IN SUPPORTING SOIL HEALTH
Jennifer Moore Kucera, Natural Resources Conservation Service
Presentation - PDF (6.6 MB)

Soil is one of our nation's most valuable resources that provides life-sustaining functions. There are literally billions of organisms living below ground that are critical to support plant, animal, and human health above ground. This session aims to unravel some of these unseen mysterious life forces and explain how they contribute to and support soil health. Learn not only what they are doing for your soils, but also what you can do to help support them. By shifting our view of soils from an inert growing material to a biologically diverse and active ecosystem, we can help create more sustainable farms, ranches, and forests to provide the food and fiber for our rapidly growing population while protecting land, air and water resources for future generations.

INTEGRATING WATER RESOURCE MONITORING AND REPORTING
Sheila Marcoe, Oregon Department of Agriculture

Statewide monitoring efforts are underway through a variety of Oregon programs/initiatives that will provide water resource benefits from further coordination and partnership for information sharing. These mulit-agency led programs work together by 1.)Looking to local organizations for information and data related to conservation and restoration actions that were implemented with agencies' respective grant programs; 2.)Telling the story of how conservation and restoration action implemented by local organizations contribute to achieving healthy watersheds; and 3.)Identifying where additional monitoring and technical assistance efforts may be needed to contribute to achieving healthy watersheds.

DRONE REGULATIONS AND PANEL DISCUSSION FOR DISTRICTS AND COUNCILS
Mitch Swecker, Oregon Department of Aviation
Presentation - PDF (1.7 MB)

Mitch Swecker with the Department of Aviation will give an overview on the use of drones by both public entities (conservation districts) and non-governmental organizations (watershed councils). He will cover the rules and regulations that special districts and watershed councils must follow. Afterward the group will engage in a facilitated discussion on all things drone-related! Topics include: registering your drone, rules and regulations, risk management, safe operation, working with landowners, choosing a drone, and integrating drones into conservation.

OWEB'S NEW ONLINE APPLICATION
Courtney Shaff, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

OWEB’s target is to launch an online grant application during the 2015-17 biennium. The goal is to improve effectiveness and efficiency of the agency’s grant-making processes for applicants, grantees and OWEB staff. The system in development currently includes the following application types: Restoration, Technical Assistance (TA), Monitoring and Outreach. Restoration, Technical Assistance (TA) and Monitoring were "streamlined" prior to developing the online applications to ensure these applications gather the key information necessary to review applications and support the grant-making process.

This session will provide participants a sneak peek at the new online application system. OWEB staff will give a preview of what the new systems looks like, talk about differences between the current paper applications and the new online applications and share next steps. This is not a hands-on session, training will be provided once the online application is complete and has been released to applicants.


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